Saturday, 13 June 2020

Complete Autism Guide with Treatments


This is where we begin to define the signs of autism and the corresponding treatments. Many of the signs of autism are portrayed in the left-hand column in red.


 Decision chart
 (sign of autism)

After consultation and analysis by a doctor, the corresponding boxes in blue on the right are often found to be an appropriate treatment or cause for the specific autism symptom. Diet and medication can often be used to address these symptoms.

When we’ve completed these initial courses of treatment, 

we should proceed to Autism Treatment .

 

Complete Autism Guide with Treatments


Autism Treatment

When you have recognized the initial signs and completed the corresponding treatments of autism, you should consult with a neurotherapist.

 

Depending on the signs of autism that your child has demonstrated, some or all of the assessment tools in green might be employed. View the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist. 

The neurotherapist can determine if the child has an autism spectrum disorder, which one it is, and how severe it is. The neurotherapist can advise you as to what additional autism treatments should be initiated.

The objective is to create an effective, coordinated set of autism treatment programs. Some of these are portrayed in purple below.

Please proceed to Autism Support .

 Autism Support .


Complete Autism Guide with Treatments



Autism Support

The needs of the child have been addressed in the last two pages of Autism Signs and Treatment.

 

The entire family, including other siblings can find information, guidance, encouragement and support through a number of avenues that are available. Several are outlined on the chart in purple. There are private parental peer groups as well as COSAC  and ParentOf Autistic Child (POAC).



Complete Autism Guide with Treatments

Parent Of Autistic Child

POAC (Parents of Autistic Children of Ocean County, NJ and Vicinity) is a group of parents sharing information on Autism and related disabilities including PDD-NOS, Asperger's Syndrome and Hyperlexia.

 

POAC is a COSAC sponsored group. You can reach The New Jersey Center for Outreach and Services for the Autistic Community, Inc by calling 1-800-4 Autism.


Treatment
 
Brainwave Definitions
 
Neurofeedback
 
Why Neurofeedback Works
 
Neurofeedback Types



Brainwave Definitions

 

Complete Autism Guide with Treatments

 

  Brainwaves image 

 

 

Beta/SMR Brainwaves: As defined by the International Federation of Electrophysiology and Clinical Neurophysiology beta brainwaves have a waveband of 12-15mHz. Beta/SMR (sensorimotor response waves) are localized by side and lobe of the brain. they're related to relaxed, yet focused, behavior. it's believed that SMR brainwave frequencies make people feel more present and within the moment. Low SMR can cause a scarcity of focused attention, reflecting ADD. Increasing SMR through Neurofeedback can produce relaxed focus in a private along side improved attentive abilities.

 

 

 

Alpha Brainwaves: As defined by the International Federation of Electrophysiology and Clinical Neurophysiology alpha brainwaves have a waveband of 8-12mHz. Alpha waves are related to relaxation and daydreaming. they're also present upon deep introspection. High frequency alpha waves don't normally occur when the eyes are open. The brain uses alpha rhythm frequencies to rest areas of the brain not processing or acting upon incoming sensory or motor information. If alpha brainwave activity becomes 'locked' and inhibited active participation of important areas of the brain cannot occur in an efficient manner.

 

 

 

Theta Brainwaves: As defined by the International Federation of Electrophysiology and Clinical Neurophysiology theta brainwaves have a waveband of 4-8mHz. They engage inner and intuitive subconscious. Theta waves are found in places within the brain where memories, sensations and emotions are held.

 

 

 

Delta Brainwaves: As defined by the International Federation of Electrophysiology and Clinical Neurophysiology delta brainwaves have a waveband of .5-3mHz. Delta brainwaves are found during deep, dreamless sleep.

 

 

 

Neurofeedback

 

Simply put, Neurofeedback exercises and helps “strengthen” the brain, calms it, and improves its stability. It’s easy – virtually anyone can roll in the hay .

 

 

 

Using computerized feedback, the brain learns to extend certain brainwaves that are helpful for improved function. The brain can be  decrease excessive fast. or slow waves that interfere with good function and  Over time, the result a healthier and better regulated brain.

 

 

 

Helping Brain Regulation

 

The brain helps regulate sleep, emotions, thinking, behavior, and far more.  training doesn't directly change  The sleep or other problems. It helps brain become better regulated. Since  The sleep, behavior or emotions  are regulated by  brain, improvements are generally seen after the training.

 

 

 

When you give the brain information about itself, it's a huge capacity for change. Neurofeedback makes the knowledge available to the brain almost instantly, and asks it to form adjustments. this provides the brain a greater ability to self-manage or regulate.

 

 Why Neurofeedback works

 

Neurofeedback is successful within the treatment of disordered brain and other neurological disorders like Autism due to the brain's resiliency and adaptableness .

 

The brain can change with assistance directed by various sensory stimuli (light, movement, sound)

 

The brain 'assists' find the best/better approach to reacting to stimuli. it's thought that the brain may create new pathways and or dendrites in response to neurofeedback (operant conditioning).

 

The brain will remain during this new state because it 'feels better'.

 

As the brain is continually used, it'll maintain this 'new skill'

 

 

 

Neurofeedback Types

 

Neurofeedback, (also referred to as EEG Biofeedback, Neurotherapy or Neurotraining), is that the process of conditioning which stabilizes the central systema nervosum using equipment that monitors and measures the electrical activity of the brain and trains the brain to be more available to life's requirements.

 

 

 

There are two sorts of Neurofeedback, Beta/SMR and Alpha/Theta. Each measures a special brainwave type.

 

 

 

Beta/SMR Neurofeedback measures the brain's Beta/SMR waves. Beta/SMR (sensorimotor response waves) are localized by side and lobe of the brain. they're related to relaxed, yet focused, behavior. it's believed that SMR brainwave frequencies make people feel more present and within the moment. Low SMR can cause a scarcity of focused attention, reflecting ADD. Increasing SMR through Neurofeedback can produce relaxed focus in a private along side improved attentive abilities.

 

 

 

Alpha/Theta Neurofeedback measures the brain's Alpha/Theta waves. Alpha waves are related to relaxation and daydreaming. they're also present upon deep introspection. High frequency alpha waves don't normally occur when the eyes are open. The brain uses alpha rhythm frequencies to rest areas of the brain not processing or acting upon incoming sensory or motor information. If alpha brainwave activity becomes 'locked' and inhibited active participation of important areas of the brain cannot occur in an efficient manner.

 

As defined by the International Federation of Electrophysiology and Clinical Neurophysiology theta brainwaves have a waveband of 4-8mHz. They engage inner and intuitive subconscious. Theta waves are found in places within the brain where memories, sensations and emotions are held.

 

 
Information


 Asperger’s Syndrome


Asperger’s Syndrome, which is additionally referred to as Autistic Psychopathy, may be a Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) characterized by impairment in social skills, difficulties with transitions or changes and a requirement for sameness within the subject's environment. consistent with Barbara Kirby of OASIS (Online Asperger’s Syndrome Information and Support) persons with AS often have obsessive routines and should be preoccupied with a specific subject of interest. they need an excellent deal of difficulty reading nonverbal cues (body language) and really often the individual with AS has difficulty determining proper body space. like other disorders within the autism spectrum, those with AS are fairly often overly sensitive to sounds, tastes, smells and sights. Prevalence of Asperger’s Syndrome appears to be more common in males. The onset of symptoms occurs later than what's seen in autism; most youngsters are diagnosed between the ages of 5 and 9.


 

Asperger’s isn't easily diagnosed. Many children are misdiagnosed with other neurological disorders like Tourette’s Syndrome. Frequently, children are misdiagnosed with ADD or ADHD, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Dr. Fred Volkmar, a toddler psychologist at Yale, asserts that, “Asperger’s appears to be even more strongly genetic than classic autism. a few third of the fathers or brothers of youngsters with Asperger’s show signs of the disorder.”


 

The behaviors of Asperger’s Syndrome can be remedied with specific types of therapy aimed at teaching social and practical skills. Individuals with AS who suffer from muscle rigidity may also be treated medically.

 

 

 Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified


Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) could also be a condition during which some, but not all, features of autism or another explicitly identified Pervasive Developmental Disorder are identified. PDD/NOS is usually incorrectly mentioned as simply "PDD." The term PDD refers to the category of conditions to which autism belongs. PDD isn't itself a diagnosis, while PDD-NOS may be a diagnosis. The term Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS; also mentioned as "atypical personality development," "atypical PDD," or "atypical autism") is included in DSM-IV to encompass cases where there's stamped debilitation of social connection, correspondence, and additionally generalized personal conduct standards or intrigue, yet when full highlights for chemical imbalance or another expressly characterized PDD aren't met.


 

It ought to be underlined that this sub-edge classification is along these lines characterized certainly, that is, no particular rules for determination are given. While shortfalls in peer relations and strange sensitivities are normally noted,social skills are less impaired than in classical autism. The lack of definition(s) for this relatively heterogeneous group of youngsters presents problems for research on this condition. The restricted accessible - proof recommend that kids with PDD/NOS likely come to proficient consideration preferably later over is that the case with mentally unbalanced youngsters, which scholarly shortages are less normal.  Child Study Center Yale,  Disabilities Developmental Clinic

 


*Autistic Disorder


The most severe of the autism spectrum disorders (ASD), autistic disorder is characterized by a severe degree of impairment in communication skills, social interaction skills and restricted, repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. It can be reliably detected by the age of 3 years and, in some cases, as early as 18 months.


Symptoms of the disorder will present themselves differently in each individual child. However, all children with ASD demonstrate deficits in a) social interaction, b) verbal and non-verbal communication and c) repetitive behaviors or interests. Additionally, they will often have unusual responses to sensory stimuli, such as sound or visual perception.

 

*Rett's Syndrome


Rett’s Syndrome could also be a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder, seen almost exclusively in females, characterized by normal early development followed by loss of functional use of the hands, distinctive hand movements, slowed brain and head growth, gait abnormalities, seizures and retardation .

 

During the first 6-18 months of life, a child with Rett's Syndrome will show apparently normal development. Then, mental and physical symptoms gradually appear. Loss of muscle tone (hypotonia) is usually a first symptom. Before long, the child will lose communication skills and the purposeful use of her hands. Other early symptoms may include problems crawling or walking and decreased eye contact. Compulsive hand movements like wringing and washing follow the loss of functional use of the hands.

 


Apraxia, the lack to perform motor functions, is probably the foremost severely disabling feature of Rett’s Syndrome. It can interfere with every one movement, including eye gaze and speech.


Autistic Spectrum Disorders

 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), additionally referenced as Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs), cause serious and unavoidable weakness in deduction, feeling, language, and consequently the office to identify with others.

 

Autistic Spectrum Disorders are usually first diagnosed in early childhood and range from a severe form, called Autistic Disorder, through Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), to a much milder form, Asperger’s Syndrome.

 

They also include two rare disorders, Rett's Syndrome and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.

 

*Autistic Disorder is one of the 5 disorders under the category of ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorders) or PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorders), which are typified by “severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development” (DSM-IV-TR). The following disorders are also categorized under the PDD umbrella:

 

Asperger's Syndrome

 
Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD)
 
Autistic Disorder
 
Rett's Syndrome
 
PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS)

 

Other symptoms may include: toe walking; sleep problems; wide-based gait; teeth grinding (bruxism); slowed growth; seizures; cognitive disabilities and disorganized breathing patterns that occur when awake (apnea or aerophagia).(IRSA and the NINDS)

 

 

Autistic Spectrum Disorders
 

ASD-Autism Spectrum Disorders , additionally referenced as Pervasive Developmental Disorders PDDs, cause severe and pervasive impairment in thinking, feeling, language, and thus the facility to relate to others.

 

Autistic Disorder is one of the 5 disorders under the category of ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorders) or PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorders), which are typified by “severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development” (DSM-IV-TR). The following disorders are also categorized under the PDD umbrella:


*Autism Symptoms

 

Since Dr. Leo Kanner in 1943 first described it, the understanding of autism has advanced tremendously. However, most of the public, including professionals in the educational and medical fields, still don’t understand how autism affects people and how to effectively work with individuals with autism.

 

Dr. Leo Kanner - Autism Symptoms
 
Dr. Leo Kanner
 

Autism is a spectrum disorder. It can present itself within both a wide combination of characteristics and a broad scale in severity of symptoms. Therefore, two children, with the same diagnosis, can behave very differently from each other and have differing skills. A person diagnosed as autistic can display any combination of behaviors or symptoms in any degree of severity.

 

A child with autism often has problems with sensory integration. Their senses may be over or under-active. The gentle touch of a flower’s petals may be felt as extremely painful; the scent of the flower might make a child gag. A child with autism may find everyday noises painful.

People with autism process and respond to information in distinctive ways such as:

 

Resistance to change

Difficulty in expressing needs

Pointing or gesturing instead of words

Repetitive words or phrases

Inappropriate laughing or crying

Aloof manner

Tantrums

Little or no eye contact

No real fear of danger

Uneven gross/fine motor skills

Non-responsive to verbal cues

Acts as though deaf although hearing tests within normal range

Noticeable physical over/under activity

It’s important for parents to understand that, no matter the diagnosis, their autistic child can learn and show gains with the proper therapy.

 

*Causes of Autism

Although there is no known single cause of autism, it is generally accepted that it is caused by abnormalities in brain structure and/or function. Brain scans show marked differences in the shape and structure of the brain in autistic versus non-autistic children. Also, studies that have been done on frontal lobe and parietal lobe brain development in autism indicate that ‘the parietal lobes are reduced in volume in a portion of the autistic population.’ (Univ. California School of Medicine, San Diego, 1993).

 

In many families, there appears to be a pattern of autism or related disabilities, supporting the theory that there is a genetic basis to the disorder. Although no single gene has been definitively linked with causing autism, researchers are searching for irregular segments of genetic code that autistic children may have inherited. It also seems that some children are born with a predisposition or susceptibility to autism. However, researchers have not identified a ‘trigger’ that causes the development of autism.

 

Others are researching the correlation between the development of autism and problems during pregnancy or delivery. Some destructive substances ingested during pregnancy additionally have been related with an expanded danger of mental imbalance.

 

Right off the bat in 2002, The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) arranged a writing audit of perilous concoction exposures and chemical imbalance and found no convincing proof for an-affiliation; be that as it may, there was exceptionally constrained exploration and all the more should be finished.

 

Environmental factors such as viral infections, metabolic imbalances and exposure to environmental chemicals are also possible causes of autism.

 

MMR injection:

Studies of the relationship between autism and immunizations continue. A 2001 investigation by the Institute of Medicine concluded that ‘evidence favors rejection of a causal relationship.... between MMR vaccines and autistic spectrum disorders (ASD).’ However, The Institute of Medicine committee that completed this investigation ‘could not rule out’ the possibility that the MMR vaccine could contribute to ASD in a small number of children. Many parents of autistic children dispute these findings because they can chronologically pinpoint changes in their child’s behavior to occurring subsequent to receiving the MMR vaccine.








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